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If You Are a Blue Lodge Mason

While there is no Masonic degree more important than that of Master Mason, there is a long tradition - almost as old as Freemasonry - of "high degrees" that expand upon and elaborate the teachings and lessons of the first three degrees. The Scottish Rite degrees teach a series of moral lessons culminating in the 32°, Master of the Royal Secret. The Scottish Rite continues a Master Mason's education in many ways:
Become a Scottish Rite Mason of Denver
In order to join the Scottish Rite you must:
  • be a proficient Master Mason in good standing in a regular Lodge;
  • complete a petition and include the appropriate fee;
  • attend a "Reunion" where the Scottish Rite Degrees are conferred.
If you are a Scottish Rite Mason in good standing from another valley or orient and you wish to affiliate with the Denver Consistory, you will need to complete an application for affiliation. If you are a Scottish Rite Mason no longer in good standing in this jurisdiction, you will need to complete an application for reinstatement.


If You Are Not a Mason

A welcoming handshake Before you can join the Scottish Rite, you first must become a Master Mason in a Lodge under a Grand Lodge that belongs to the Conference of Grand Masters in North America (COGMINA) or to a Grand Lodge recognized by a COGMINA Grand Lodge. Joining the fraternity of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons requires that a man, of his own free will, petition a Masonic Lodge to receive the three Degrees in Masonry.

Below are the general steps that a man seeking membership in Freemasonry may consider. Lodges will likely have their own procedures, but this will help you get started and give you a better understanding of the process.

Ask for Information
If you know a Mason, ask him about the fraternity. Don't be shy, we love talking to those interested in Masonry. If you don't know a Mason, you can use the Lodge Locator to find a Lodge near you and contact them.

Visit the Lodge
Try to find out if there is a good time for you to visit the Lodge. Take this as an opportunity to meet some of the members and ask questions. Don't be intimidated, they'll be happy to see you. Most Lodges have dinner before their regular stated meetings (meetings usually occur monthly) and guests are almost always welcome. In many areas more than one Lodge may exist. Visit as many as you can, get a feeling for the Lodges you visit and pick the one that best meets your needs.

Request a Petition
Request a petition from a Mason or from the Lodge you would like to join. You can also download a PDF version of the petition. Your petition will require the signature of several Masons. If you don't know any Masons, ask the lodge you're petitioning for advice.

Submit Your Petition
Turn in your completed petition to the Lodge you would like to join. Ask if there are any fees that need to accompany the petition. Your petition will be received by the Lodge and will be read during a stated meeting.

Now that the Lodge has your petition, these are the actions you can expect the Lodge to take:

The Investigation
The Master of the Lodge you submitted your petition to will assign two or three members of the Lodge to interview you and investigate your background. The interviewers may want to meet with you at home. There is a standard set of questions that all interviewers must ask, but many will ask additional questions. Be honest with the interviewers. No Mason is perfect… we don't expect petitioners to be perfect, either.

The Ballot
Your interviewers will be given a deadline by which to return their completed investigation reports to the Lodge. Their reports along with their recommendation will be read to the Lodge at a stated meeting. At this time, the Master of the Lodge will usually call for a ballot to be taken on your petition. Eligible Masons present will then vote on your petition and the outcome of the ballot will be announced to the Lodge.

After the Ballot
Soon after the stated meeting, a member from the Lodge should contact you with the outcome of the ballot and provide you with additional instructions.